Claude Venard (French, 1913-1999)

Claude Venard (1913-1999) was a central figure of the post-war School of Paris and became internationally renowned during the 1950’s for his bold heavily impastoed Post-Cubist paintings, built up through layer upon layer of pigment incorporating different resins and varnishes. In the words of Andre Salmon in 1962 “It is certain the works of Claude Venard are not meant for empty souls or tepid hearts”.

Source: Claude Venard: Fine Works, 1950-1965, Hanina Fine Arts, London





Claude Venard, Les Deux Pichets, ca. 1960. Oil on canvas, 100 x 100 cm, (39 1/2 x 39 1/2 in). Galerie Vercel, New York.



Claude Venard, Femme Avec Coupe de Fruits, ca. 1959. Oil on canvas, 114 x 146 cm (44 3/4 x 57 1/2 in), Galerie Vercel, New York.



Claude Venard, Nature Morte Avec et Fleur, ca. 1958. Oil on canvas, 65 x 54 cm, (25 1/2 x 21 1/4 in).



Claude Venard, Nature Morte À La Lampe, ca. 1955. Oil on canvas, 75 x 75 cm (29 1/2 x 29 1/2 in). Galerie Romanet, Paris.



Claude Vernard, Green Landscape. Oil on canvas, 32 x 45 cm. Harriet Cohen Collection, Royal Academy of Music, London. &copy ADAGP, Paris and DACS, London 2014.



Claude Venard, Paysage. Oil on canvas, 14.5 x 27 cm. Harriet Cohen Collection, Royal Academy of Music, London. &copy ADAGP, Paris and DACS, London 2014.



Claude Venard, Le Port. Gouache on paper mounted on canvas, 65 x 100 cm. Galerie Delorme, Paris.



Claude Venard, Campagne Mittre. Oil on canvas, 51.25 x 76.75 in. (130.2 x 194.9 cm.) Anne French Fine Art, Miami.



Claude Venard, Nude in Motion, 1969. Oil on canvas, size 39.5 x 39.5 inch (100cm x 100 cm). Anne French Fine Art, Miami.

American Art Gallery

About: The American Art Gallery offers “one of the largest online collections of American Art. This educational website is free and features thousands of artist profiles and their artwork.”

William Glackens, Afternoon at Coney Island, ca. 1913. Chalk, watercolor, and gouache on paper, 14 1/2 x 18 5/8 in. (36.8 x 47.3 cm). Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY

Exhibits:

Exhibit: American Revolutionary War

Howard Pyle, Battle Of Bunker Hill, ca.1897. Oil, 23 1/4 x 35 1/4 inches. Delaware Art Museum, Wilmington, DE (acquired 1912).

Exhibit: The White Mountain School

Frederic Marlett Bell-Smith, Crawford Notch from Mount Willard, 1895. Watercolor, 13 1/4 x 19 1/2 inches.

Alexander Calder, Green Cheese, 1963. Gouache and india ink on paper, 12 3/8 × 16 7/8 inches (31.5 × 42.8 cm). Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, Gift, William C. Edwards, Jr. in memory of Sibyl H. Edwards 80.2766 © 2014 Calder Foundation, New York / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Source: Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum: Online Collection, http://www.guggenheim.org/new-york/collections/collection-online/artwork/751

Alexander Calder, Green Cheese, 1963. Gouache and india ink on paper, 12 3/8 × 16 7/8 inches (31.5 × 42.8 cm). Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, Gift, William C. Edwards, Jr. in memory of Sibyl H. Edwards 80.2766 © 2014 Calder Foundation, New York / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Source: Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum: Online Collection, http://www.guggenheim.org/new-york/collections/collection-online/artwork/751

William McGregor Paxton (1869-1941), Girl Combing Her Hair, 1909. Oil on canvas, 68.6 x 55.9 cm (27.01” x 22.01”). Private collection.

About Paxton (The Caldwell Gallery):

"William McGregor Paxton attended Cowles Art School, Acadamie Julian (1889-90, 92) and Ecole Des Beaux Arts, where he studied under the painter Gerome. Paxton was an integral part of the Boston School, a group of painters that included Tarbell, Benson and Hale. He was well known for his extraordinary attention to the effects of light and detail in flesh and fabric. Paxton’s compositions were most often idealized young women in beautiful interiors. Paxton gained fame for his portraiture and painted both Grover Cleveland and Calvin Coolidge. He taught at the Boston Museum of Fine Arts School from 1906 to 1913. His highly finished surfaces, painted in the Beaux Arts manner, seemed to emphasize material surroundings and Paxton had been criticized for imitating the superficiality of the high class. Paxton was made a full member of the Nation Academy of Design in 1928."



Sources:
Art Renewal Center, http://artrenewal.org/pages/artwork.php?artworkid=9114

The Caldwell Gallery: Biographies: William McGregor Paxton, http://www.caldwellgallery.com/bios/paxtonbio.html

William McGregor Paxton (1869-1941), Girl Combing Her Hair, 1909. Oil on canvas, 68.6 x 55.9 cm (27.01” x 22.01”). Private collection.

About Paxton (The Caldwell Gallery):

"William McGregor Paxton attended Cowles Art School, Acadamie Julian (1889-90, 92) and Ecole Des Beaux Arts, where he studied under the painter Gerome. Paxton was an integral part of the Boston School, a group of painters that included Tarbell, Benson and Hale. He was well known for his extraordinary attention to the effects of light and detail in flesh and fabric. Paxton’s compositions were most often idealized young women in beautiful interiors. Paxton gained fame for his portraiture and painted both Grover Cleveland and Calvin Coolidge. He taught at the Boston Museum of Fine Arts School from 1906 to 1913. His highly finished surfaces, painted in the Beaux Arts manner, seemed to emphasize material surroundings and Paxton had been criticized for imitating the superficiality of the high class. Paxton was made a full member of the Nation Academy of Design in 1928."

Sources:

alluraadelson asked:

What is the source of the quote from Francis Bacon, artist:“The creative process is a cocktail of instinct, skill, culture and a highly creative feverishness. It is not like a drug; it is a particular state when everything happens very quickly, a mixture of consciousness and unconsciousness, of fear and pleasure; it’s a little like making love, the physical act of love.”

The European Graduate School of Graduate & Postgraduate Studies - Library - Francis Bacon - Quotes: http://www.egs.edu/library/francis-bacon-artist/quotes/

Francis Picabia, Portrait of Mistinguett, ca. 1908–11. Oil on canvas, 23 5/8 × 19 3/8 inches (60 × 49.2 cm). Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York 66.1801 © 2014 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris.


Artwork Description & Analysis: The style of this portrait, with its simplified forms and flat color, blends aspects of Symbolism and Fauvism and is typical of Picabia’s maturing style as he began to try his hand at different approaches. Painted at a time when he was slowly building a conventional, successful career as an Impressionist, it might be taken as a sign of Picabia’s frequent later habit of striking out in new and surprising directions. The model for the picture, Mistinguett, was a successful actress and singer, and was one of Picabia’s first famous friends from the entertainment industry (she was at one time the lover of Maurice Chevalier). Independently wealthy, Picabia enjoyed the life of the bon viveur and was often drawn to music halls, nightclubs, circuses, and the cinema. He met Mistinguett during one of his visits to the Parisian revues. Instead of painting a realistic portrayal of her, he was much more interested in revealing the mood of the time by using dramatic color and composition.


Sources:
Guggenheim Online Collection
The Art Story - Analysis of ‘Portrait of Mistinguett’

Francis Picabia, Portrait of Mistinguett, ca. 1908–11. Oil on canvas, 23 5/8 × 19 3/8 inches (60 × 49.2 cm). Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York 66.1801 © 2014 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris.

Artwork Description & Analysis: The style of this portrait, with its simplified forms and flat color, blends aspects of Symbolism and Fauvism and is typical of Picabia’s maturing style as he began to try his hand at different approaches. Painted at a time when he was slowly building a conventional, successful career as an Impressionist, it might be taken as a sign of Picabia’s frequent later habit of striking out in new and surprising directions. The model for the picture, Mistinguett, was a successful actress and singer, and was one of Picabia’s first famous friends from the entertainment industry (she was at one time the lover of Maurice Chevalier). Independently wealthy, Picabia enjoyed the life of the bon viveur and was often drawn to music halls, nightclubs, circuses, and the cinema. He met Mistinguett during one of his visits to the Parisian revues. Instead of painting a realistic portrayal of her, he was much more interested in revealing the mood of the time by using dramatic color and composition.