Jack Tworkov: A site dedicated to the life and work of American painter Jack Tworkov

Jack Tworkov (1900-1982) was a founding member of the New York School and is regarded as one of the great artists, along with Willem de Kooning, Philip Guston, Jackson Pollock, and Franz Kline, whose gestural paintings of the 1950s formed the basis for the abstract expressionist movement in America. This site highlights the Tworkov’s historic presence and significant contribution to American Art of the Twentieth Century and includes the catalogue raisonné project of works on canvas by Jack Tworkov currently being compiled by curator and archivist Jason Andrew. 

Jack Tworkov: The Works on Canvas – A Catalogue Raisonne Project

Portrait of Doug Roach, 1930 (estate no. 00B). Oil on canvas, 11 1/4 x 9 in. (28.6 x 22.9 cm). Estate of Jack Tworkov, New York. © Copyright 2014 Estate of Jack Tworkov.

Untitled (Street Scene: Downtown New York), c.1930  (estate no. 870). Oil on canvas, 16 x 20 in. (40.6 x 50.8 cm). Private collection, Highland Park, IL. Photo: Michael Rosenfeld Gallery LLC, New York, NY.

Old Man at the Machine (Portrait of the Artist’s Father), 1931 (estate no. 00L). Oil on canvas, 24 x 34 in. (61 x 86.4 cm). Estate of Jack Tworkov, New York. © Copyright 2014 Estate of Jack Tworkov.

View of Bay, Provincetown, 1931  (estate no. 001A). Oil on canvas, 20 1/8 x 30 3/16 in. (51.1 x 76.7 cm). Estate of Jack Tworkov, New York. © Copyright 2014 Estate of Jack Tworkov.

The Card Player, 1938  (estate no. 007A). Oil on canvas, 30 x 25 in. (76.2 x 63.5 cm). Estate of Jack Tworkov, New York. © Copyright 2014 Estate of Jack Tworkov.

Untitled (Woman reading), c.1941  (estate no. 010). Oil on canvas, 18 1/8 x 15 in. (46 x 38.1 cm). Private collection, courtesy Patti Gilford Fine Arts. Photo: Courtesy Valerie Carberry Gallery.

Still Life, 1945  (estate no. 826). Oil on canvas, 24 x 32 in. (61 x 81.3 cm). Collection of the Yellowstone Art Museum, Billings, Montana (1979.012). Photo: Courtesy Yellowstone Art Museum.

Geneva, 1948  (estate no. 016). Oil on canvas, 30 x 27 in. (76.2 x 68.6 cm). Labels verso: University Art Museum, University of Texas, Austin,TX ; Poses Institute of Fine Arts, Brandeis University, Waltham, 1964. Estate of Jack Tworkov, New York. © Copyright 2014 Estate of Jack Tworkov.

Old Man, 1948  (estate no. 791). Oil on canvas, 29 3/4 x 23 3/4 in. (75.6 x 60.3 cm). Collection of the American University Museum, Katzen Center, Washington, D.C. (1950.4). Photo: Courtesy American University Museum, Katzen Center, Washington, D.C.; photo: Greg Staley.

Untitled (Red Nude), 1948  (estate no. 00E). Oil on masonite, 20 x 12 in. (50.8 x 30.5 cm). Private collection, Munich, Germany.

          

Athene, 1949  (estate no. 636). Oil on canvas, 80 x 37 in. (203.2 x 94 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. The Muriel Kallis Steinberg Newman Collection. Gift of Muriel Kallis Newman (2006.32.62). Photo: Courtesy of The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

House of the Sun Variation, 1952  (estate no. 577). Oil on canvas,39 x 35 in. (99 x 89 cm). Labels verso: Andre Emmerich Gallery; Wayne Andersen Gallery. Private collection, New York.

OC #54, 1958  (estate no. 031). Oil on canvas, 18 x 14 in. (45.7 x 35.6 cm). Estate of Jack Tworkov, New York. © Copyright 2014 Estate of Jack Tworkov.

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The contents of this site, including all images and text, are for educational and non-commercial use only and are the sole property of the Estate of Jack Tworkov. The contents of this site may not be reproduced in any form without the written request and permission granted by the Estate of Jack Tworkov. Reproduction rights for all possible uses by third parties must be cleared in writing with the Estate’s copyright representative, VAGA (Visual Arts and Galleries Association)© Copyright 2014 Estate of Jack Tworkov. All Rights Reserved.


Jane Olivor’s rendition of Don McLean’s Vincent.

Lyrics:

Starry, starry night Paint your palette blue and gray Look out on a summer’s day With eyes that know the darkness in my soul

Shadows on the hills Sketch the trees and the daffodils Catch the breeze and the winter chills In colors on the snowy linen land

Now I understand What you tried to say to me How you suffered for your sanity How you tried to set them free They would not listen they did not know how Perhaps they’ll listen now

For they could not love you But still your love was true And when no hope was left in sight On that starry, starry night

You took your life as lovers often do But I could have told you Vincent This world was never meant for one As beautiful as you

Starry, starry night Portraits hung in empty halls Frameless heads on nameless walls With eyes that watch the world and can’t forget

Like the strangers that you’ve met The ragged men in ragged clothes The silver thorn, a bloody rose Lie crushed and broken on the virgin snow

Now I think I know What you tried to say to me How you suffered for your sanity How you tried to set them free They would not listen, they’re not listening still Perhaps they never will

Artistic Inspiration: Betty Woodman

Things emerge in my studio from a seen image or experience that gets recalled in whatever work I am doing. The work becomes a conduit of the memory of a painting, a landscape, architecture, or some other visual stimulus. Once it starts to manifest itself in my art, the topic and subject then gets further researched in books, visits to museums, or by another trip.

-Betty Woodman

(Source: Frank Lloyd Wright Gallery artist biographies: excerpt from Two Bronze Benches and Four “Ceramic Pictures” of Korean Paintings, November 23, 2002 - April 13, 2003, interview with curator Patterson Sims

Cup and saucer

Betty Woodman (Designer: Viola Frye), Cup & Saucer, ca. 1986. Porcelain, cup: H. 3-1/2, Diam. 4-1/2 inches (8.9 x 11.4 cm), saucer: H. 2, Diam. 6-1/2 inches (5.1 x 16.5 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2000.427a.b. 

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Betty Woodman, Pillow Pitcher, 1983. Glazed earthenware, 19 x 16 x 23 in. (48.3 x 40.7 x 58.4 cm.). Smithsonian American Art Museum, Gift of Jocelyn and Charles Woodman, 1992.42. (Smithsonian American Art Museum, Luce Foundation Center, 4th Floor, 53B).

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Betty Woodman, Kimono Vases: Evening, 1990. Glazed earthenware, part A: 31 x 22 1/2 x 8 1/2 in. (78.7 x 57.1 x 21.6 cm) part B: 31 x 23 5/8 x 8 1/2 in. (78.7 x 60.0 x 21.6 cm). Smithsonian American Art Museum, Gift of the James Renwick Alliance and museum purchase made possible by the Smithsonian Institution Collections Acquisition Program, 1992.118A-B.

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Betty Woodman, Installation View, “Windows, Carpets and Other Paintings”, Salon 94 Freemans, 2013.

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Betty Woodman, Color Sample Vase, 2009. Glazed earthenware, 35 × 28 × 6 inches (89 × 71 × 15 cm). Salon 94 Freemans, New York.

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Betty Woodman (American, b. 1930), Still Life Vase #10, 1990. Glazed earthenware. Brooklyn Museum, Gift of Laurence Shopmaker in memory of Scott Brown, 1992.109.

Betty Woodman, Diptych: the Balcony, painted earthenware

Betty Woodman, Diptych: the Balcony, painted earthenware, 2008.

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Betty Woodman, Floral Vase and Shadow, 1983 (work by part of her solo retrospective at the Met).

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Betty Woodman, The Ming Sisters, 2003. Glazed earthenware, epoxy resin, lacquer and paint, 32 x 81 x 8 in. (81.3 x 205.7 x 20.3 cm).

Theo van Rysselberghe, Figures near a Well in Morocco, 1883. Oil on canvas, 197 x 130 cm. Private collection.


Theo van Rysselberghe came from a family of architects. He began studying art in Ghent and then in Brussels. His first paintings were definitely classical in style, but later he overcame his resistance to Neo-Impressionist theories, and at the last Impressionist exhibition in 1886 he broke his walking stick in front of Seurat’s picture La Grand Jatte. However two years earlier he had been involved in starting an avant-garde group in Brussels, known as Les Vingt, and he was also their Paris correspondent. This group had no special theories; its only object was to get up exhibitions illustrating the newest tendencies in European art. In 1888, the Vingt group invited Signac, Dubois-Pillet and Cross to come and visit them, and as a result several Belgian painters, Rysselberghe among them reached a very much better understanding of Neo-Impressionism. Not long after that Rysselberghe, who had become friendly with Seurat, Signac and Cross, began to practice divisionism in his portrait painting using small dots of different sizes on one canvas. He went on practicing this divisionist technique until about 1910, although towards the end of his life he reverted to a more academic style.  He exhibited not only with the Vingt but also with the  Libre Esthetique, Art Contemporain and Independants, and also sometimes at the official Paris Salon. Rysselberghe was involved with various artistic groups and was a close friend of Verhaeren, whose portrait he painted in 1913. Rysselberghe often went abroad, particularly to Morocco, before finally settling in Paris in 1898. He had a great influence on the development of’ Neo-Impressionism in Belgium, more perhaps through his connection with the Group des Vingt than by his actual painting.  A retrospective exhibition of his works  was held in 1927 in Brussels, a year after his death; Maurice Denis wrote the introduction to the catalogue.

The Web Gallery of Impressionism: Based on Phaidon’s Encyclopedia of Impressionism by Maurice Serullaz (1978)

Theo van Rysselberghe, Figures near a Well in Morocco, 1883. Oil on canvas, 197 x 130 cm. Private collection.

Theo van Rysselberghe came from a family of architects. He began studying art in Ghent and then in Brussels. His first paintings were definitely classical in style, but later he overcame his resistance to Neo-Impressionist theories, and at the last Impressionist exhibition in 1886 he broke his walking stick in front of Seurat’s picture La Grand Jatte. However two years earlier he had been involved in starting an avant-garde group in Brussels, known as Les Vingt, and he was also their Paris correspondent. This group had no special theories; its only object was to get up exhibitions illustrating the newest tendencies in European art. In 1888, the Vingt group invited Signac, Dubois-Pillet and Cross to come and visit them, and as a result several Belgian painters, Rysselberghe among them reached a very much better understanding of Neo-Impressionism. Not long after that Rysselberghe, who had become friendly with Seurat, Signac and Cross, began to practice divisionism in his portrait painting using small dots of different sizes on one canvas. He went on practicing this divisionist technique until about 1910, although towards the end of his life he reverted to a more academic style. He exhibited not only with the Vingt but also with the Libre Esthetique, Art Contemporain and Independants, and also sometimes at the official Paris Salon. Rysselberghe was involved with various artistic groups and was a close friend of Verhaeren, whose portrait he painted in 1913. Rysselberghe often went abroad, particularly to Morocco, before finally settling in Paris in 1898. He had a great influence on the development of’ Neo-Impressionism in Belgium, more perhaps through his connection with the Group des Vingt than by his actual painting. A retrospective exhibition of his works was held in 1927 in Brussels, a year after his death; Maurice Denis wrote the introduction to the catalogue.

The Web Gallery of Impressionism: Based on Phaidon’s Encyclopedia of Impressionism by Maurice Serullaz (1978)

Vincent (Starry Starry Night) by Don McLean

Starry starry night, paint your palette blue and grey
Look out on a summer’s day with eyes that know the darkness in my soul
Shadows on the hills, sketch the trees and the daffodils
Catch the breeze and the winter chills, in colors on the snowy linen land

Now I understand what you tried to say to me
How you suffered for you sanity
How you tried to set them free
They would not listen they did not know how, perhaps they’ll listen now

Starry starry night, flaming flowers that brightly blaze
Swirling clouds in violet haze reflect in Vincent’s eyes of china blue
Colors changing hue, morning fields of amber grain
Weathered faces lined in pain are soothed beneath the artist’s loving hand

Chorus:
For they could not love you, but still your love was true
And when no hope was left in sight, on that starry starry night
You took your life as lovers often do,
But I could have told you, Vincent,
This world was never meant for one as beautiful as you

Starry, starry night, portraits hung in empty halls
Frameless heads on nameless walls with eyes that watch the world and can’t forget.
Like the stranger that you’ve met, the ragged man in ragged clothes
The silver thorn of bloody rose, lie crushed and broken on the virgin snow

Now I think I know what you tried to say to me
How you suffered for you sanity How you tried to set them free
They would not listen they’re not listening still
Perhaps they never will.

                         

The more I thought about it, the more interesting and challenging the idea became. I put down the book and picked up my guitar, which was never far away, and started fiddling around, trying to get a handle on this idea, while the print of ‘Starry Night’ stared up at me. Looking at the picture, I realized that the essence of the artist’s life is his art. And so, I let the painting write the song for me. Everyone is familiar with that painting.” -Don McLean

(Source: Don McLean Online - http://www.don-mclean.com/?p=107)

Grace Hartigan, Lili Marlene, 2006. Oil on linen, 54 x 48 inches (137.2 x 121.9 cm). C. Grimaldis Gallery.

Hartigan is admired for having, as one critic noted, “resolved the problem that doomed many artists of the New York School: where to go from art in the 1950s.” Since she was able to reconcile abstraction with her usage of realism and iconography, she influenced many future artists, including Neo-Expressionists like David Salle and Julian Schnabel. She made the Maryland Institute College of Art a nationally prominent program and mentored hundreds of students during her tenure there. 
Source: ArtStory


          
           
                                  (courtesy: ArtStory)

Grace Hartigan, Lili Marlene, 2006. Oil on linen, 54 x 48 inches (137.2 x 121.9 cm). C. Grimaldis Gallery.

Hartigan is admired for having, as one critic noted, “resolved the problem that doomed many artists of the New York School: where to go from art in the 1950s.” Since she was able to reconcile abstraction with her usage of realism and iconography, she influenced many future artists, including Neo-Expressionists like David Salle and Julian Schnabel. She made the Maryland Institute College of Art a nationally prominent program and mentored hundreds of students during her tenure there. 

Source: ArtStory

          

           

                                  (courtesy: ArtStory)

André Masson, The Landscape of Wonders (Paysage aux prodiges), 1935. Oil on canvas, 30 1/8 × 25 3/4 inches (76.5 × 65.4 cm). Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, Bequest, Richard S. Zeisler 2007.44 © 2014 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris.


French painter, draughtsman, printmaker and stage designer. His work played an important role in the development of both Surrealism and Abstract Expressionism, although his independence, iconoclasm and abrupt stylistic transitions make him difficult to classify…Masson’s early works, particularly the paintings of 1922 and 1923 on a forest theme (e.g. Forest, 1923; see Leiris and Limbour, p. 93), reflected the influence of André Derain, but by late 1923 he had moved away from Derain towards Analytical Cubism…Between 1924 and 1929 (when Breton expelled Masson from the Surrealist group) the biomorphic abstractions of Miró and Masson dominated Surrealist painting. Masson spent much of the period between 1930 and 1937 in the south of France and in Spain. During this period he explored themes and subjects drawn from Greek mythology, Spanish literature and the Spanish Civil War…

Masson’s most important commission was his invitation from André Malraux to paint the ceiling of the Théâtre de l’Odéon in Paris (1965). Masson continued to divide his time between Paris and the south of France. The course of his work was marked less by stylistic unity than by his commitment to art as a poetic, philosophical and psychological exploration. His last work expanded the themes of transformation and metamorphosis that he began in 1922.

Source:  MoMA Online Collection: About the Artist - entry by Whitney Chadwick, From Grove Art Online, © 2009 Oxford University Press

André Masson, The Landscape of Wonders (Paysage aux prodiges), 1935. Oil on canvas, 30 1/8 × 25 3/4 inches (76.5 × 65.4 cm). Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, Bequest, Richard S. Zeisler 2007.44 © 2014 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris.

French painter, draughtsman, printmaker and stage designer. His work played an important role in the development of both Surrealism and Abstract Expressionism, although his independence, iconoclasm and abrupt stylistic transitions make him difficult to classify…Masson’s early works, particularly the paintings of 1922 and 1923 on a forest theme (e.g. Forest, 1923; see Leiris and Limbour, p. 93), reflected the influence of André Derain, but by late 1923 he had moved away from Derain towards Analytical Cubism…Between 1924 and 1929 (when Breton expelled Masson from the Surrealist group) the biomorphic abstractions of Miró and Masson dominated Surrealist painting. Masson spent much of the period between 1930 and 1937 in the south of France and in Spain. During this period he explored themes and subjects drawn from Greek mythology, Spanish literature and the Spanish Civil War…

Masson’s most important commission was his invitation from André Malraux to paint the ceiling of the Théâtre de l’Odéon in Paris (1965). Masson continued to divide his time between Paris and the south of France. The course of his work was marked less by stylistic unity than by his commitment to art as a poetic, philosophical and psychological exploration. His last work expanded the themes of transformation and metamorphosis that he began in 1922.

Source: MoMA Online Collection: About the Artist - entry by Whitney Chadwick, From Grove Art Online, © 2009 Oxford University Press

Edward Hopper, Sunlight in a Cafeteria, 1958. Oil on canvas, 102.1 x 152.7 cm. Yale University Art Gallery, Bequest of Stephen Carlton Clark, B.A. (1903), 1961.18.31
Hopper wrote to his patron, Stephen Clark, in September, 1958: “I’m very pleased that you have acquired my picture, Sunlight in a Cafeteria. I think it’s one of my very best pictures.” From his youth, Hopper had been intrigued by people in urban restaurants, sketching one such scene when he was only fourteen years old. There is little communication between the figures in these ordinary settings, suggesting the lack of emotional interaction in much of modern life. In Sunlight in a Cafeteria, he conveys an unsettling tension between the man and woman, who are clearly aware of, but do not acknowledge, each other’s presence. As in almost all his paintings, Hopper creates an edgy stillness that suggests multiple narrative possibilities. (Yale University Art Gallery)


Sources:
Yale University Art Gallery
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Edward Hopper, Sunlight in a Cafeteria, 1958. Oil on canvas, 102.1 x 152.7 cm. Yale University Art Gallery, Bequest of Stephen Carlton Clark, B.A. (1903), 1961.18.31

Hopper wrote to his patron, Stephen Clark, in September, 1958: “I’m very pleased that you have acquired my picture, Sunlight in a Cafeteria. I think it’s one of my very best pictures.” From his youth, Hopper had been intrigued by people in urban restaurants, sketching one such scene when he was only fourteen years old. There is little communication between the figures in these ordinary settings, suggesting the lack of emotional interaction in much of modern life. In Sunlight in a Cafeteria, he conveys an unsettling tension between the man and woman, who are clearly aware of, but do not acknowledge, each other’s presence. As in almost all his paintings, Hopper creates an edgy stillness that suggests multiple narrative possibilities. (Yale University Art Gallery)

Sources:

In love, there’s sentiment and passion; I know only sentiment through myself, passion through others. I hear certain voices I know say: sentiment equals love of the intellect; I can answer: passion equals the love of the body

Berthe Morisot (French Impressionist Painter, 1841-1895)

Berthe Morisot, Julie Daydreaming, 1894. Oil on canvas. Private Collection.