alluraadelson asked:

What is the source of the quote from Francis Bacon, artist:“The creative process is a cocktail of instinct, skill, culture and a highly creative feverishness. It is not like a drug; it is a particular state when everything happens very quickly, a mixture of consciousness and unconsciousness, of fear and pleasure; it’s a little like making love, the physical act of love.”

The European Graduate School of Graduate & Postgraduate Studies - Library - Francis Bacon - Quotes: http://www.egs.edu/library/francis-bacon-artist/quotes/

Francis Picabia, Portrait of Mistinguett, ca. 1908–11. Oil on canvas, 23 5/8 × 19 3/8 inches (60 × 49.2 cm). Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York 66.1801 © 2014 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris.


Artwork Description & Analysis: The style of this portrait, with its simplified forms and flat color, blends aspects of Symbolism and Fauvism and is typical of Picabia’s maturing style as he began to try his hand at different approaches. Painted at a time when he was slowly building a conventional, successful career as an Impressionist, it might be taken as a sign of Picabia’s frequent later habit of striking out in new and surprising directions. The model for the picture, Mistinguett, was a successful actress and singer, and was one of Picabia’s first famous friends from the entertainment industry (she was at one time the lover of Maurice Chevalier). Independently wealthy, Picabia enjoyed the life of the bon viveur and was often drawn to music halls, nightclubs, circuses, and the cinema. He met Mistinguett during one of his visits to the Parisian revues. Instead of painting a realistic portrayal of her, he was much more interested in revealing the mood of the time by using dramatic color and composition.


Sources:
Guggenheim Online Collection
The Art Story - Analysis of ‘Portrait of Mistinguett’

Francis Picabia, Portrait of Mistinguett, ca. 1908–11. Oil on canvas, 23 5/8 × 19 3/8 inches (60 × 49.2 cm). Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York 66.1801 © 2014 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris.

Artwork Description & Analysis: The style of this portrait, with its simplified forms and flat color, blends aspects of Symbolism and Fauvism and is typical of Picabia’s maturing style as he began to try his hand at different approaches. Painted at a time when he was slowly building a conventional, successful career as an Impressionist, it might be taken as a sign of Picabia’s frequent later habit of striking out in new and surprising directions. The model for the picture, Mistinguett, was a successful actress and singer, and was one of Picabia’s first famous friends from the entertainment industry (she was at one time the lover of Maurice Chevalier). Independently wealthy, Picabia enjoyed the life of the bon viveur and was often drawn to music halls, nightclubs, circuses, and the cinema. He met Mistinguett during one of his visits to the Parisian revues. Instead of painting a realistic portrayal of her, he was much more interested in revealing the mood of the time by using dramatic color and composition.

Pierre Alechinsky, Vanish (Disparaître), 1959. Oil on canvas, 78 3/4 × 110 1/4 inches (200 × 280 cm). Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, Gift, Julian and Jean Aberbach 67.1848 © 2014 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris.


"Pierre Alechinsky was a central figure in Cobra, a European artists’ group that emphasized material and its spontaneous application. The abstract and concrete often merge in his work; in Vanish (Disparaître, 1959), Alechinsky focused on the appearance and disappearance of a female figure in the center of the canvas. This emergent shape and the background coalesce into a vigorously brushed surface that is distinguished by thickly impastoed white pigment and a network of predominantly blue lines. There are still traces of the allover patterning that characterizes the artist’s watercolors and earlier canvases such as The Ant Hill (La fourmilière, 1954). His work likewise exhibits a fluidity and vitality that points to the artist’s fascination with Japanese calligraphy, which he observed during his travels to Japan in 1955."


Source: The Guhgenheim Collection - http://www.guggenheim.org/new-york/collections/collection-online/artwork/205

Pierre Alechinsky, Vanish (Disparaître), 1959. Oil on canvas, 78 3/4 × 110 1/4 inches (200 × 280 cm). Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, Gift, Julian and Jean Aberbach 67.1848 © 2014 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris.

"Pierre Alechinsky was a central figure in Cobra, a European artists’ group that emphasized material and its spontaneous application. The abstract and concrete often merge in his work; in Vanish (Disparaître, 1959), Alechinsky focused on the appearance and disappearance of a female figure in the center of the canvas. This emergent shape and the background coalesce into a vigorously brushed surface that is distinguished by thickly impastoed white pigment and a network of predominantly blue lines. There are still traces of the allover patterning that characterizes the artist’s watercolors and earlier canvases such as The Ant Hill (La fourmilière, 1954). His work likewise exhibits a fluidity and vitality that points to the artist’s fascination with Japanese calligraphy, which he observed during his travels to Japan in 1955."

Source: The Guhgenheim Collection - http://www.guggenheim.org/new-york/collections/collection-online/artwork/205

The truly creative mind in any field is no more than this: A human creature born abnormally, inhumanly sensitive. To him… a touch is a blow, a sound is a noise, a misfortune is a tragedy, a joy is an ecstasy, a friend is a lover, a lover is a god, and failure is death. Add to this cruelly delicate organism the overpowering necessity to create, create, create - so that without the creating of music or poetry or books or buildings or something of meaning, his very breath is cut off from him. He must create, must pour out creation. By some strange, unknown, inward urgency he is not really alive unless he is creating.

Pearl Buck (American author & Nobel laureate, 1892-1973)

Source: http://thepeopleproject.com/quotes

Artistic Inspiration: Louis Valtat (1869-1952)

                    

                 (Renoir, Portrait of Louis Valtat, ca. 1904)

"French painter, printmaker and stage designer, Louis Valtat was born in 1869 in Dieppe. Much of his youth was spent in Versailles and in 1887 he moved to Paris, where he studied under Gustave Moreau at the Ecole des Beaux- Arts. He also studied under Jules Dupré at the Académie Julian where he met Edouard Vuillard, Albert André, Pierre Bonnard and Maurice Denis" [IFPDA].

"Valtat exhibited widely, not only at the Salon des Indépendants and the Salon d’Automne but also at Le Libre Esthétique in Brussels in 1900. In 1905 he exhibited a seascape at the Salon d’Automne, where it was shown alongside the work of the painters who came be known as the Fauves…His later years found him concentrating on still life paintings and floral scenes, as well as landscapes…As one modern scholar has written, ‘Valtat was, in his own way, an intimiste, not only when he painted interiors or flowers or still lifes in his warm tones, but also when he turned his joie de vivre to the landscapes that indicated his constant preoccupation with the representation of nature as he saw it, bathed in peace and sunlight.His canvases, suffused with light like that of a golden summer’s day, can hardly contain the full explosion of his physical and mental well-being’”[RoGallery].

Louis Valtat, Femme assise avec deux chats couches sur ses genoux, c. 1905. Woodcut in colors, 31.5 x 26.2 cm. Galerie Grillon, Paris, France.

Louis Valtat, Alger, La Casbah, 1906. Oil on canvas, 65 x 81 cm. Galerie von Vertes, Zurich, Switzerland.

Louis Valtat, Deux Femmes. Watercolor on paper, 12.62 x 9.5 in. (32.1 x 24.1 cm.). Jody Klotz Fine Art Inventory.

Louis Valtat, Danseuses1919. Oil on canvas, 39 1/2 x 32 in., (100.3 x 81.3 cm). Estate of the artist Nathan Cummings, Chicago (by 1992), Christies Impressionist & Modern Sale, May 2010, Lot 309.

Louis Valtat, La couturiere.  8.1/8 x 6.1/8 in, ca. 1925. Oil on canvas, 8.1/8 x 6.1/8 in. (20.5 x 15.5 cm.)