In love, there’s sentiment and passion; I know only sentiment through myself, passion through others. I hear certain voices I know say: sentiment equals love of the intellect; I can answer: passion equals the love of the body

Berthe Morisot (French Impressionist Painter, 1841-1895)

Berthe Morisot, Julie Daydreaming, 1894. Oil on canvas. Private Collection.

The feeling of love is among the greatest and eternal aspects one discovers in the human spirit. It is remarkable in that it survives under all circumstances and trials, it always retains its appeal in the sphere of art…

Chingiz Aitmatov (Forward to Jamila)

Excerpt from Russiapedia:

Chinghiz Aitmatov was the most celebrated representative of Kyrgyzstan… [and] is revered for building a bridge between the world of traditional Kyrgyz folklore and modern Eurasian literature. A bilingual and bicultural writer, Aitmatov wrote his prose and plays in both his native Kyrgyz and in Russian. His works have been translated into more than 150 languages. He brilliantly combined elements of Kyrgyz folktales and epics with formally traditional Russian realism.

A major theme in Aitmatov’s stories concerns inequality among male and female members of traditional Central Asian society…He writes about the lack of access to education in the region (especially in rural areas and particularly for girls), treatment of women as commodities and polygamy…Aitmatov believed that mankind’s socio-political, economic, ideological and even environmental problems would disappear if education could be advanced beyond rote memorization, and if a true communal concern, a true love, could meld humans and nature. Chingiz Aitmatov declared: “In the end, what is right? What should be the standard for distinguishing between right and wrong? I have to believe that it is love for our fellow human beings, a love that wishes all who have been born on this planet happiness and freedom. No ideology or national structure is more important than this. And it is when people love that they become true heroes.

Sources:

George Hendrik Breitner, Girl in White Kimono, 1894. Oil on canvas, 59 × 57 cm (23.2 × 22.4 in. Bequeathed to the Rijksmuseum Amsterdam, Amsterdam, by Mr. and Mrs. Drucker-Fraser, Montreux (1944), SK-A-3584.


Inspired by Japanese prints, Breitner made at least twelve paintings around 1894 of a girl in a kimono. She assumes different poses and the kimono often has a different colour. What catches the eye here is the embroidered, white silk kimono with red-trimmed sleeves and an orange sash. The dreamy girl is sixteen-year-old Geesje Kwak, a hat-seller and one of Breitner’s regular models.
Source: Rijksmuseum



           
George Hendrik Breitner, Girl in Red Kimono, Geesje Kwak, 1893-95. Oil on canvas, 24 x 19 1/2 in. Noortman Master Paintings, Amsterdam. On behalf of private collection, Netherlands. 

George Hendrik Breitner, Girl in White Kimono, 1894. Oil on canvas, 59 × 57 cm (23.2 × 22.4 in. Bequeathed to the Rijksmuseum Amsterdam, Amsterdam, by Mr. and Mrs. Drucker-Fraser, Montreux (1944), SK-A-3584.

Inspired by Japanese prints, Breitner made at least twelve paintings around 1894 of a girl in a kimono. She assumes different poses and the kimono often has a different colour. What catches the eye here is the embroidered, white silk kimono with red-trimmed sleeves and an orange sash. The dreamy girl is sixteen-year-old Geesje Kwak, a hat-seller and one of Breitner’s regular models.

Source: Rijksmuseum

           2012_02_17_snapshot2.jpg

George Hendrik Breitner, Girl in Red Kimono, Geesje Kwak, 1893-95. Oil on canvas, 24 x 19 1/2 in. Noortman Master Paintings, Amsterdam. On behalf of private collection, Netherlands. 

Artistic Inspiration: Richard Pousette-Dart

20130917-075416.jpg

Richard Pousette-Dart, Desert, 1940. Oil on canvas, 43 x 72 inches. Museum of Modern Art, New York. © The Estate of Richard Pousette-Dart.

A fiercely independent artist throughout his career, Richard Pousette-Dart contributed meaningfully to key discourses that shaped the emergence of Abstract Expressionism. In 1948 he attended gatherings at the Subjects of the Artist school, an informal group organized by William Baziotes, David Hare, Robert Motherwell and Mark Rothko that would later became known as the Eighth Street Club. In 1950 he participated in a three-day conference at Studio 35, and a year later his painting was included in the landmark exhibition Abstract Painting and Sculpture in America at The Museum of Modern Art, which had acquired his Number 11: A Presence (1949). In 1951, Pousette-Dart gained additional renown by appearing in Nina Leen’s iconic photograph “The Irascibles” in Life Magazine featuring prominent painters who had formally protested contemporary art policies at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.</em

Courtesy The Estate of Richard Pousette-Dart

Source: http://informationaesthetic.wordpress.com/2013/09/17/artistic-inspiration-richard-pousette-dart/

Artistic Inspiration: Eugene J. Martin (July 24, 1938 – January 1, 2005)

View original Post: Artistic Inspiration: Eugene J. Martin (July 24, 1938 – January 1, 2005) - Information Aesthetic, 27 August 2013

“Eugene Martin (1938-2005) is best known for his imaginative, complex mixed media collages on paper, his often gently humorous pencil and pen and ink drawings, and his paintings on paper and canvas that may incorporate whimsical allusions to animal, machine and structural imagery among areas of “pure”, constructed, biomorphic, or disciplined lyrical abstraction. Martin called many of his works straddling both abstraction and representation ‘satirical abstracts’.”

© Estate of Eugene J. Martin

Eugene J. Martin, Mars at some point in time, 1969. Mixed media on paper. © 2013 Estate of Eugene James Martin.  All Rights Reserved

Eugene J. Martin, Untitled, 1966. Mixed media work on paper. © 2013 Estate of Eugene James Martin.  All Rights Reserved

     

Eugene J. Martin, Untitled, 1966. Oil on canvas. © 2013 Estate of Eugene James Martin.  All Rights Reserved

Eugene J. Martin, Untitled, 1968. Oil on canvas. Estate of Eugene J. Martin

                

Eugene J. Martin, Untitled, 1966. Oil on canvas. Estate of Eugene J. Martin. © 2013 Estate of Eugene James Martin.  All Rights Reserved

Eugene J. Martin, Untitled, 1964. Oil on canvas. Estate of Eugene J. Martin. © 2013 Estate of Eugene James Martin.  All Rights Reserved

Eugene Martin, Undated, 1960.  © 2013 Estate of Eugene James Martin.  All Rights Reserved

Eugene J. Martin, Untitled, 2003. Acryllic painting on canvas. © 2013 Estate of Eugene James Martin.  All Rights Reserved

Eugene Martin’s Studio in Lafayette, LA. © 2013 Estate of Eugene James Martin.  All Rights Reserved

Eugene Martin in his studio in Lafayette, Louisiana, 2000. © 2013 Estate of Eugene James Martin.  All Rights Reserved

__________________________________________

References

infoaesthetic:

Pictures taken on Court Street between Schermerhorn &amp; State Streets in Downtown Brooklyn / Brooklyn Heights (right at the border)….and, not surprisingly, it was the homage to Basquiat* that initially captured my eye.
____________________________
*Jean-Michel Basquiat (1960-1988), Untitled (Aopkhes), 1982. Acrylic, oilstick and paper collage on canvas mounted on wood supports, 72 1/2 x 35 7/8in. (184 x 91cm.)


An oldie but goodie.
Zoom Info
infoaesthetic:

Pictures taken on Court Street between Schermerhorn &amp; State Streets in Downtown Brooklyn / Brooklyn Heights (right at the border)….and, not surprisingly, it was the homage to Basquiat* that initially captured my eye.
____________________________
*Jean-Michel Basquiat (1960-1988), Untitled (Aopkhes), 1982. Acrylic, oilstick and paper collage on canvas mounted on wood supports, 72 1/2 x 35 7/8in. (184 x 91cm.)


An oldie but goodie.
Zoom Info
infoaesthetic:

Pictures taken on Court Street between Schermerhorn &amp; State Streets in Downtown Brooklyn / Brooklyn Heights (right at the border)….and, not surprisingly, it was the homage to Basquiat* that initially captured my eye.
____________________________
*Jean-Michel Basquiat (1960-1988), Untitled (Aopkhes), 1982. Acrylic, oilstick and paper collage on canvas mounted on wood supports, 72 1/2 x 35 7/8in. (184 x 91cm.)


An oldie but goodie.
Zoom Info

infoaesthetic:

Pictures taken on Court Street between Schermerhorn & State Streets in Downtown Brooklyn / Brooklyn Heights (right at the border)….and, not surprisingly, it was the homage to Basquiat* that initially captured my eye.

____________________________

*Jean-Michel Basquiat (1960-1988), Untitled (Aopkhes), 1982. Acrylic, oilstick and paper collage on canvas mounted on wood supports,
72 1/2 x 35 7/8in. (184 x 91cm.)

An oldie but goodie.

Richard Hamilton, Solomon R. Guggenheim, 1967. Oil on photograph, sheet: 7 1/2 × 7 1/4 inches (19.1 × 18.4 cm). Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, 67.1858. © 2014 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / DACS, London.


Excerpt of biography (courtesy the Guggenheim Online Collection: Often identified as the founder of Pop art, Hamilton first garnered recognition for his work during the 1956 exhibition This is Tomorrow, organized by the Independent Group at the Whitechapel Art Gallery, London. Just What Is It That Makes Today’s Homes So Different, So Appealing? (1956), a collage comprised of modernist iconography culled from mass-circulation magazines and referred to as the very first work of Pop art, visualizes comfortable, modern living but with an ironic overtone. Hamilton’s enthrallment with American consumer culture, mass-production techniques, and contemporary mechanical processes manifested heavily within his practice, as did his veneration for the work of Marcel Duchamp….




Richard Hamilton, Self Portrait 67, 1967.

Richard Hamilton, Solomon R. Guggenheim, 1967. Oil on photograph, sheet: 7 1/2 × 7 1/4 inches (19.1 × 18.4 cm). Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, 67.1858. © 2014 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / DACS, London.

Excerpt of biography (courtesy the Guggenheim Online Collection: Often identified as the founder of Pop art, Hamilton first garnered recognition for his work during the 1956 exhibition This is Tomorrow, organized by the Independent Group at the Whitechapel Art Gallery, London. Just What Is It That Makes Today’s Homes So Different, So Appealing? (1956), a collage comprised of modernist iconography culled from mass-circulation magazines and referred to as the very first work of Pop art, visualizes comfortable, modern living but with an ironic overtone. Hamilton’s enthrallment with American consumer culture, mass-production techniques, and contemporary mechanical processes manifested heavily within his practice, as did his veneration for the work of Marcel Duchamp….

Richard Hamilton, Self Portrait 67, 1967.

Loïs Mailou Jones, Ode to Kinshasa, 1972. Mixed media on canvas, 48 x 36 inches. The National Museum of Women in the Arts, Washington, D.C., gift of the artist, 1997.105. © Lois M. Jones Pierre-Noel Trust.

About Ode to Kinshasa (courtesy NMWA):


Ode to Kinshasa is named for the capital city of the Democratic Republic of Congo in Africa, where Loïs Mailou Jones traveled in the early 1970s as a researcher and U.S. cultural ambassador.Jones’s ability to paint in a wide range of styles reflects both her extensive training and the profound impact that travel had upon her oeuvre…During her trips to Africa, Jones visited many museums and sketched objects she saw there. After returning to the U.S., she developed semi-abstract compositions inspired by the historical objects she had studied.

In Ode to Kinshasa, Jones adapted the triangle and diamond patterns painted onto traditional masks by artists in many West and Central African communities; the eye in the center of Jones’s composition refers to her source of inspiration. The intense colors and clean-edged forms in this painting are balanced by its nuanced surface texture, which incorporates pieces of gold foil and Japanese paper in Jones’s careful collage technique.



Sources:
National Museum of Women in the Arts (NMWA): 20th Century Artists: Loïs Mailou Jones

Loïs Mailou Jones Trust: Private and Public Collections”

Loïs Mailou Jones, Ode to Kinshasa, 1972. Mixed media on canvas, 48 x 36 inches. The National Museum of Women in the Arts, Washington, D.C., gift of the artist, 1997.105. © Lois M. Jones Pierre-Noel Trust.

About Ode to Kinshasa (courtesy NMWA):

Ode to Kinshasa is named for the capital city of the Democratic Republic of Congo in Africa, where Loïs Mailou Jones traveled in the early 1970s as a researcher and U.S. cultural ambassador.Jones’s ability to paint in a wide range of styles reflects both her extensive training and the profound impact that travel had upon her oeuvre…During her trips to Africa, Jones visited many museums and sketched objects she saw there. After returning to the U.S., she developed semi-abstract compositions inspired by the historical objects she had studied.

In Ode to Kinshasa, Jones adapted the triangle and diamond patterns painted onto traditional masks by artists in many West and Central African communities; the eye in the center of Jones’s composition refers to her source of inspiration. The intense colors and clean-edged forms in this painting are balanced by its nuanced surface texture, which incorporates pieces of gold foil and Japanese paper in Jones’s careful collage technique.

Sources:

Abstraction allows man to see with his mind what he cannot physically see with his eyes… Abstract art enables the artist to perceive beyond the tangible, to extract the infinite out of the finite. It is the emancipation of the mind. It is an explosion into unknown areas.

Arshile Gorky

Salvador Dalí Catalogue Raisonné of Paintings (1910-1951)

The Salvador Dali Catalogue Raisonné was launched in 2004 under the auspices of Gala-Salvador Dalí Foundation, to mark the centennial of the artist’s birth and with the purpose of assembling and sharing — as an online publication — a rigorous and comprehensive body of information about the works painted by Dalí between 1910 and 1983. The basic information used in the catalogue comes from the very extensive documentary archive of the Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí, and has been supplemented with material from the equally important archive of the Salvador Dalí Museum in St. Petersburg, Florida.

Website: http://www.salvador-dali.org/cataleg_raonat/index.html?lang=en